The town of Lapshe, a Tamang village, is in one of MCC’s project areas. Tamang are one of the largest ethnic minority groups in Nepal and are considered by the Nepalese government to be an underprivileged/disadvantaged group. With all that kind of demographic data it can be easy to forget the real people MCC works with and for; real people like Jhuma Tamang.

Jhuma Tamang is one of the participants in the CFGB funded project Improving Mother’s and Children’s Nutritional Health project implemented by MCC’s partner organization the Rural Institute for Community Development (RICOD). Jhuma is also the proud mother of a nine month old baby girl named Nehma. At one of our recent nutritional trainings I had the opportunity to sit down with Jhuma for a quick interview.

MM: Why did you participate in this program?

JT: I knew a little about RICOD before. When I was a student they did projects in our school for youth. I really liked those projects and learned a lot. Now, when I heard about this training, I remembered how much I liked the previous programs so I decided to come and learn more at this training.

MM: What are some of the things you have learned from this training so far?

JT: I learned a lot about pregnancy and child birth, things like what to eat before and after. I have also learned about the three types of food (RICOD’s training curriculum divides foods into three simple groups: energy giving, body building, and body protecting).

MM: What things in your life have changed since attending this training?

JT: Before I didn’t know what to eat or feed my child. Since coming to the trainings I now know about the three types of food and how to eat healthy. I have changed what I eat and what I feed my daughter. I eat all three types of healthy food now.

MM: What is your hope for the future?

JT: I am not too certain about the future. But, if I had to say something, I think good things will come from the training. I hope everybody can learn and practice what we have been taught.

Article by: Malcolm McDermond